Student confident tiny home will keep mom warm even in winter | CBC News

​This is an interesting architectural exercise…but he wants his mom to live in it?  in winter?  in Edmonton?
The Comments that appear below the article are about 80/20 in favor of the guy’s creation and his motivation.   The nay-sayers figure his mom must have really ticked him off.  Only two of the Comments pointed out that this poop-box of a trailer might provide a big improvement on his mom’s current circumstances.
​https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/tiny-house-ottawa-carleton-university-hgtv-1.4922355

If you’ve walked through Carleton’s campus in Ottawa, you may have seen him: A young man working away on a wooden structure just outside the architecture building. He’s building a tiny house, but it isn’t for him — it’s for his mother to live in year-round in Edmonton.

Source: Student confident tiny home will keep mom warm even in winter | CBC News

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Premier Doug Ford’s cap-and-trade move will cost treasury $3B over four years | The Star

“Yes, that means less money for government — that’s more money for families.”

I don’t know where to start…Government of Ontario revenues will go down by $3B and provincial Environment Minister Rod Phillips spins it as windfall for Ontario families.

Source: Premier Doug Ford’s cap-and-trade move will cost treasury $3B over four years | The Star

City of Toronto election laws and the Charter’s “not withstanding” clause

The City of Toronto probably based its recent case against the Province on the Charter’s freedom of expression provision (Section 2) and not on the Charter’s freedom to participate in elections (Section 3) because Section 3 covers only Federal and Provincial elections, not (explicitly) municipal elections.  This morning I read some legal opinions that say Judge Belobaba’s decision may have stretched this Section 2 provision too far by extending it to election rights.
It’s interesting that the “not withstanding” clause (Section 33) applies explicitly to Section 2 freedoms but not to Section 3.  So the provincial government can probably get away with invoking it from a legal perspective.  But that sure doesn’t make it right.
The decision makes interesting reading…almost “folksy” in a lot of places.  I particularly liked paragraphs 76 -77, quoted in their entirety below:
[76]     Dealing with the second objective, voter parity, and giving the Minister the benefit of the doubt that he understood that the primary concern is not voter parity but effective representation, there is no evidence of minimal impairment. The Province’s rationale for moving to a 25-ward structure had been carefully considered and rejected by the TWBR and by City Council just over a year ago. If there was a concern about the large size of some of the City’s wards (by my count, six wards had populations ranging from 70,000 to 97,000) why not deal with these six wards specifically? Why impose a solution (increasing all ward sizes to 111,000) that is far worse, in terms of achieving effective representation, than the original problem? And, again, why do so in the middle of the City’s election?

[77]     Crickets.

[78]     I am therefore obliged to find on the evidence before me that the breaches of s. 2(b) of the Charter as found above cannot be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society and cannot be saved as reasonable limits under s. 1.

Engineering utility-scale PV installations that are “pollinator-friendly”

It hadn’t occurred to me that there might not be enough acreage to support utility-scale solar electricity.  It turns out that not everyone wants a PV farm in their backyard. And I hadn’t considered the trade-off between lots of available sunshine (Death Valley) and lots of electricity users (not Death Valley).  So….PV site developers have figured out some ways of making their installations more neighbor-friendly.

“Conventional solar installation techniques typically involve turf grass and gravel as ground cover, which removes vegetation and flattens landscapes, according …. These methods lead to high preparation and labor costs, expected to account for 20% of the price of photovoltaic installations by 2020.

“Conversely, seeding solar grounds with native plant species provides agricultural and ecological benefits that gravel and turf cannot, such as better stormwater control because of plants’ deeper roots. Seeding can also boost solar efficiency by creating a cooler microclimate around the panels, which boosts solar efficiency, said Gavin Meinschein, a lead civil engineer at ENGIE Distributed Solar.Although the upfront costs for seeding are higher than installation of turf grass, the maintenance over projects’ 25-30 year lifespan is cheaper because it’s less involved, Meinschein said.Native plant sites can double as pollinator-friendly sites, an “irresistible synergy,” said John Jacob, who founded Old Sol Apiairies in 1997 and now works with solar developers to integrate bee farms and solar developments.The pollinator benefit is a specific twist to the story that has gotten buzz in local and national media.” ….Story continues…..

Source: Pollinator habitats: The bees’ knees of rural solar development | Utility Dive

Are utilities missing out on the opportunity to use old coal sites for solar? | Utility Dive

Repurposing shuttered coal plant sites is “an overlooked opportunity to put these sites back into use and bring jobs and investment to communities that have been hit hard,” McKittrick said. “A lot of utilities tear the plant down, put a fence around the site, and forget about it, but they can turn these liabilities into assets.”
— Read on www.utilitydive.com/news/are-utilities-missing-out-on-the-opportunity-to-use-old-coal-sites-for-sola/518319/