10 engines and 6 propellers

10 engines and 6 propeller sets, actually. Imagine working with the mad scientists who thought of that combination. Call me old-fashioned if you will, but Number of Propellers divided by Number of Engines should be a (positive) whole number.

from Saunders-Roe Princess – Wikipedia

The SR.45 Princess was a large flying boat, being the largest all-metal flying boat to have ever been constructed. The Princess featured a rounded, bulbous, “double-bubble” pressurized fuselage which contained two full passenger decks; these decks had sufficient room to accommodate up to 105 passengers in great comfort. The planing bottom of the hull had only a slight step in the keel to minimize drag in the air.[24] The Princess was powered by an arrangement of ten Bristol Proteus turboprop engines. These engines drove six sets of four-bladed propellers; of these, the inner four propellers were double, contra-rotating propellers which were driven by a twin version of the Proteus, named the Bristol Coupled Proteus, each engine drove one of the propellers. The two outer propellers were single and each powered by a single engine.[8]

Source: Saunders-Roe Princess – Wikipedia

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