Student confident tiny home will keep mom warm even in winter | CBC News

​This is an interesting architectural exercise…but he wants his mom to live in it?  in winter?  in Edmonton?
The Comments that appear below the article are about 80/20 in favor of the guy’s creation and his motivation.   The nay-sayers figure his mom must have really ticked him off.  Only two of the Comments pointed out that this poop-box of a trailer might provide a big improvement on his mom’s current circumstances.
​https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/tiny-house-ottawa-carleton-university-hgtv-1.4922355

If you’ve walked through Carleton’s campus in Ottawa, you may have seen him: A young man working away on a wooden structure just outside the architecture building. He’s building a tiny house, but it isn’t for him — it’s for his mother to live in year-round in Edmonton.

Source: Student confident tiny home will keep mom warm even in winter | CBC News

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Engineering utility-scale PV installations that are “pollinator-friendly”

It hadn’t occurred to me that there might not be enough acreage to support utility-scale solar electricity.  It turns out that not everyone wants a PV farm in their backyard. And I hadn’t considered the trade-off between lots of available sunshine (Death Valley) and lots of electricity users (not Death Valley).  So….PV site developers have figured out some ways of making their installations more neighbor-friendly.

“Conventional solar installation techniques typically involve turf grass and gravel as ground cover, which removes vegetation and flattens landscapes, according …. These methods lead to high preparation and labor costs, expected to account for 20% of the price of photovoltaic installations by 2020.

“Conversely, seeding solar grounds with native plant species provides agricultural and ecological benefits that gravel and turf cannot, such as better stormwater control because of plants’ deeper roots. Seeding can also boost solar efficiency by creating a cooler microclimate around the panels, which boosts solar efficiency, said Gavin Meinschein, a lead civil engineer at ENGIE Distributed Solar.Although the upfront costs for seeding are higher than installation of turf grass, the maintenance over projects’ 25-30 year lifespan is cheaper because it’s less involved, Meinschein said.Native plant sites can double as pollinator-friendly sites, an “irresistible synergy,” said John Jacob, who founded Old Sol Apiairies in 1997 and now works with solar developers to integrate bee farms and solar developments.The pollinator benefit is a specific twist to the story that has gotten buzz in local and national media.” ….Story continues…..

Source: Pollinator habitats: The bees’ knees of rural solar development | Utility Dive

See How Gotta Groove Presses Gorgeous Vinyl Records

There’s a video embedded in article – about a fast-growing company in Cleveland that makes vinyl records.  Lots and lots of vinyl records.

The video shows the techniques that go into producing limited-run vinyl records and it also shows the human contribution that goes into each record. There’s no room for robots in this plant.

Source: See How Gotta Groove Presses Gorgeous Vinyl Records

How Life Shatters Chemistry’s Mirror

Fascinating article from 2009. If life exists in other parts of our solar system it is probably “left handed” in the sense that the amino molecules of life on Earth are left-handed. But life in other parts of the universe might be right-handed.

How Life Shatters Chemistry’s Mirror

 

Human Factors – the Del Key

On my occasional-use laptop, the Ins, Del, Home and End are all nestled together – too close for my fingers to use reliably – and labeled with letters that are too small for my eyes to see reliably.  Of these four keys, I use the Del key the most.  (Not as much as the BackSpace key, of course, but it is both uniquely sized and positioned).
A couple of days ago…Eureka!  I cut out a little post-it note and put in on top of the Del key.  Problem solved?  No, it wasn’t solved.
I used a red Post-It note, thinking it would be easy to see and that the colour would be a clue to its function. I was half-right.
Now when I need to delete something, the Del key is easy to see but, unconsciously, I avoid touching that red key.  I find myself (days of occasional use later) seeking the Del key on either side of the red key.
Humans!